WHO WE ARE : FARABOUT COALITION

   The Farabout Peninsula Coalition represents a large number of stakeholders:   Eagle Lake First Nation,    Permanent and seasonal residents,    Tourist businesses (eight fishing lodges in the immediate vicinity of Farabout Peninsula) ,   Commercial Fishery , and   Recreational users of Eagle Lake.      Our purpose is to save the Farabout Peninsula area of Eagle Lake in Northwest Ontario from a clear-cut of trees being considered by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, in collaboration with the Dryden Forest Management Company.    The Farabout Peninsula is located in the centre of the most used part of Eagle Lake - an area of the lake with the highest concentrated population of residents, businesses and tourist lodges.    There will be substantial adverse effects of a proposed clear-cut of trees on the peninsula on the quality of life to residents, visitors and businesses, and most importantly to the fish and wildlife species and their habitats.    The Coalition advocates for Eagle Lake’s area tourism, sport and commercial fishing, and eco-tourism which engages and employs approximately 50 people. A proposed harvest of the small geographic area of Farabout Peninsula will detrimentally impact many livelihoods in the local tourist-based industry.    A clear-cut of trees on the peninsula will negatively impact fish, plants, birds and wildlife.    For example:   ·  Muskellunge spawning (for which Eagle Lake has international reputation),   ·  Endangered bird species in this locale (e.g., it is the site of multiple Canada Warbler nests),   ·  Rare plants (e.g., Lapland Buttercup and Hooker's Orchid).      Further, road construction that is required to access the peninsula will impact the isthmus as an animal corridor for moose, deer, timber wolves and smaller mammal      It is just common sense to permanently remove the Farabout Peninsula from tree harvesting in order to ensure the full protection of the:      * fish, wildlife and their habitats,      * our local tourist-based industries,       * aesthetic and recreational values,       * drinking water quality for local permanent and seasonal residents,        * fragile state of local municipal roads.

The Farabout Peninsula Coalition represents a large number of stakeholders:

Eagle Lake First Nation,

Permanent and seasonal residents,

Tourist businesses (eight fishing lodges in the immediate vicinity of Farabout Peninsula),

Commercial Fishery, and

Recreational users of Eagle Lake.

Our purpose is to save the Farabout Peninsula area of Eagle Lake in Northwest Ontario from a clear-cut of trees being considered by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, in collaboration with the Dryden Forest Management Company.

The Farabout Peninsula is located in the centre of the most used part of Eagle Lake - an area of the lake with the highest concentrated population of residents, businesses and tourist lodges.

There will be substantial adverse effects of a proposed clear-cut of trees on the peninsula on the quality of life to residents, visitors and businesses, and most importantly to the fish and wildlife species and their habitats.

The Coalition advocates for Eagle Lake’s area tourism, sport and commercial fishing, and eco-tourism which engages and employs approximately 50 people. A proposed harvest of the small geographic area of Farabout Peninsula will detrimentally impact many livelihoods in the local tourist-based industry.

A clear-cut of trees on the peninsula will negatively impact fish, plants, birds and wildlife.

For example:

· Muskellunge spawning (for which Eagle Lake has international reputation),

· Endangered bird species in this locale (e.g., it is the site of multiple Canada Warbler nests),

· Rare plants (e.g., Lapland Buttercup and Hooker's Orchid).

Further, road construction that is required to access the peninsula will impact the isthmus as an animal corridor for moose, deer, timber wolves and smaller mammal

It is just common sense to permanently remove the Farabout Peninsula from tree harvesting in order to ensure the full protection of the:

* fish, wildlife and their habitats,

* our local tourist-based industries,

* aesthetic and recreational values,

* drinking water quality for local permanent and seasonal residents,

* fragile state of local municipal roads.